The purpose of my contact is to ask you for some help as we plan our 1:1 initiative. Our school district is in the first year of our 1:1. We have approximately 100 students per grade. This year we will be issuing laptops to all grade 6 students. Our plan is to expand this to grades 6-8 in 2010-2011 and finally grades 9-12 in 2011-2012.

We are looking for some data on how many technicians and instructional coaches we need to add as this initiative grows.

I was wondering if you could provide some feedback on how your district moved to a 1:1 and at what points did you add additional personnel. How was this decided?

Thank you very much for your time and feedback.

Tags: 1:1, laptops, personnel

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Hi Bill,
In North Carolina, we've started a Ning that is specifically designed to support 1:1 educators. I invite you (and other 1:1 educators) to join! : http://nc1to1.ning.com/

To address your request more specifically, I suggest that you take a look at some of the resources that we provided participants who attended our 1:1 Institute this summer. Greene Co., NC has posted some great resources on our Summer Institute wiki: http://leadinginnovation09.wikispaces.com/Leading+Systemic+Change-+...

Hope this helps!
Sherry
I wish I could be of some help. I found this because I am looking to start 1:1 at my school. I am struggling to choose the right, durable laptops. If anyone has suggestions about how to choose, or laptops that they love (especially pcs), I'm all ears. coleg@cee-school.org
Hi,

This is our systems approach to 1:1 for our 1300+ schools 500000 students environment...http://education.qld.gov.au/smartclassrooms/strategy/sc-bytes.html look for the 21 steps Byte article.

Cheers!

Adrian

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