Types of Resumes Formats to Consider Based on Audience

Writing a resume for an employer can be a trying experience. The first step is to choose a format that best suits a job seeker's audience and job. The article was prepared with the support of writers from the CaResumeServices company.

Whether it be a targeted, inventory, chronological, functional, or combination, each format of a resume has its own set of rules to follow and targeted audience to engage. With all these choices, how will job seekers ever make a decision about which style and format is best for the job they're going after?

Resume Formats

The first format to consider is called a targeted resume. A targeted resume is used to focus the resume toward a specific career objective, performed in a specific industry, and for a specific company. The content of a targeted resume is written to highlight the skills, qualifications, and experience that match the requirements of the job target.

Secondly, there is the inventory resume. If there is only a general objective and job seekers don't want to limit themselves to a specific job title, an inventory resume may be the best choice. Likewise, if job seekers want to be able to use the same resume to apply to a number of companies, they should write an inventory resume. This type of resume is designed to highlight prospective employee skills, qualifications, and achievements in a more general manner.

Next is the chronological resume. The chronological resume is designed to highlight progressive career growth and advancement. It is easy to read and can be quickly scanned for employment history. For these reasons, it is the most accepted format among hiring authorities. In fact, many even prefer and/or expect it.

Then there's the functional resume. The functional resume highlights key skills, accomplishments, and qualifications at the top of the resume, regardless of where they have occurred in one's career. The employment history of the job seeker is de-emphasized by placing it toward the bottom of the resume and by documenting a simple listing rather than details of each position. In this way, the functional resume firmly places the focus on what was done rather than where or when it was done.

And finally, there is the combination resume. The combination format combines the benefits of both the chronological and the functional formats. By beginning with a summary (functional format) of the most impressive qualifications, skills, abilities, and accomplishments, it immediately places the emphasis where job seekers will want it. This is followed by an employment history section, written in the chronological format, that supports the statements made in the summary.

The Best Resume Format

Each resume format has its own distinct quality and focus depending on the type of position being applied for and the type of information being included by the job seeker. Once job seekers choose a format, they must then organize that format into a tightly-written, sharply-focused resume that will win their prospective employer over.

For this reason, deciding on the best format to use is every bit as crucial as the content of the resume itself, as both contribute to the resume's overall focus. Job seekers should in order to make a lasting impression on their prospective employers.

About Author: Marina is a career advisor at Resume Writers Nyc and blogger from Today.com. She is focusing on helping people break down their limits, find a dream job and achieve life and career success at Resume Writer La company.

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