Getting started ~ putting knowledge into practice

Following the excellent Weaving Technology conference that was held in Wagga, NSW, Australia last October I composed a few ideas regarding the thought or process or getting started with technology in the classroom.

I blogged about these ideas here on my main blog ~ Watershed.

Essentially, when starting out with technology in the classroom I feel it is useful to keep the following three rules of thumb in mind...

1. Choose an aspect of the curriculum with which you hold a passion.
2. Choose an online tool with which you feel comfortable or ‘clicks’ for you.
3. Steer a simple, straightforward path at the outset.

You can read more about each of these ideas over at Watershed.

As well, timimg is also important... For example I find term III is favourable moment when the pressure is off somewhat. No final exams and no reports to write.

You can find me via my blog, Twitter and Diigo.

Cheers, John.

Views: 42

Tags: learning, teaching

Comment by Annette Vartha on January 2, 2009 at 6:29pm
I like your comment "choose an online tool with which you feel comfortable or 'clicks' for you" I find there are so many ideas out there that you don't know where to start - and it all gets a bit overwhelming what to do first... By taking 'baby steps' and doing just one thing at a time it would make introducing new technology more manageable and do-able! Thank you - your three rules of thumb make a lot of sense and put it all into perspective!!!
Comment by John Larkin on June 9, 2009 at 3:46am
Thank you Annette for your comments. It is much appreciated. Sorry for this late reply. Been a little quiet of late.
Take care, John

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